Notes

Notes

This section is for reader supplied clarifications, suggestions, corrections or other notes regarding the text.  If you have something to add just send me an email.   I learn something new just about every day!

 c1913 Bruno Cello Mandolin Style D with reverse scroll and three point body

c1913 Bruno Cello Mandolin Style D with reverse scroll and three point body

1.      On page 99 of my text, I state that the reverse scroll three point body shape for mandolin was used by other builders in Chicago besides the Larson Brothers, particularly Regal.  Regal certainly built a number of reverse scroll mandolins though most Regal labeled reverse scroll mandolins have only two body points, not three.  Bob Hartman, author of The Larsons’ Creations - Guitars & Mandolins, recently sent me close up photos of two reverse scroll, three point Regal-branded mandocellos and one mandolin.  Bob has not had the opportunity to inspect these instruments personally and compare their specs to Larson built examples.  Still he acknowledges that these instruments, along with similarly shaped three point instruments under the Stahl, Maurer, Euphonon and Bruno brands, might all in fact have been built by the Larson brothers.


  The Cadenza , February 1910, Vol. XVI No. 8

The Cadenza, February 1910, Vol. XVI No. 8

2.       On the back book cover and on pages 47 and 591, I use the term “classical” banjo while in other places in the book I use the term “classic” banjo.  Most fingerstyle banjo players prefer the terms “classic” or just “fingerstyle” to describe the instrument as the early repertoire for the instrument was very broad including jigs, marches, waltzes, polkas, the “Trio” format of instrumental music, rags, operatic selections, popular ballads and songs, traditional melodies, and other popular music of the day in addition to bona fide classical favorites arranged for banjo. 

 

                                     


 c1934 Prairie State Four String Guitar

c1934 Prairie State Four String Guitar

3.       On page 539 of the text, I state that the c1934 Prairie State is the only known Larson built four string guitar.  Naturally, a second example has now surfaced!  The second example, which I have only seen in a photo recently forwarded to me, is a Euphonon brand four string guitar, also Brazilian rosewood with the same headstock shape and pickguard.